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Welcome to Shine Orthodontics!

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Why Shine Orthodontics?

What is an orthodontist?

Life with Braces

Invisalign Teen

Adult Treatment

Invisalign

Emergency Management

There are three steps in an orthodontist's education: college, dental school and orthodontic residency program. It can take 10 or more years of education after high school to become an orthodontist. After completing college requirements, the prospective orthodontist attends dental school. Upon graduation, the future orthodontist must be accepted* as a student in an accredited orthodontic residency program, then successfully complete a minimum of two academic years of study. The orthodontic student learns the skills required to manage tooth movement (orthodontics) and guide facial development (dentofacial orthopedics).

  • Only those who have successfully completed this formal education may call themselves orthodontists.
  • Orthodontists limit their scope of work to orthodontics only.**
  • Orthodontists are uniquely qualified in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of orthodontic problems. They dedicate their professional lives to creating healthy, beautiful smiles in children, teens and adults. Well-aligned teeth are more than attractive: they make it possible to bite, chew and speak effectively. Orthodontic care is often part of a comprehensive oral health plan.
  • Orthodontists use a variety of appliances, including braces, clear aligner trays and retainers, to move teeth or hold them in their new positions. Because of orthodontists' advanced education and clinical experience, they have the knowledge and skills necessary to recommend the best kind of appliance to meet every individual patient's treatment goals.
  • Only orthodontists are eligible for membership in the American Association of Orthodontists.


*On average, there are about 15 applicants for every opening.
**Unless they have also completed specialty education in another dental specialty recognized by the American Dental Association.

Live Life Shining

Orthodontic treatment can be successful at any age, and adults especially appreciate the benefits of a beautiful smile. One of every five patients in orthodontic treatment is over 21. Now more than ever adults are electing to undergo orthodontic treatment. The reasons are many and varied and include:

  • Tooth alignment for a straight smile
  • Close spaces between teeth
  • Correct jaw alignment that can cause headaches, jaw and neck pain
  • Correct dental problems caused by a missing tooth
  • Adults have special needs during orthodontic treatment, as the rapid facial growth that occurred during childhood and adolescence is completed and therefore, cannot be incorporated into their treatment plan.

Adults generally have a dentition that has been modified due to tooth wear, previous dental or orthodontic treatment, disease and other factors such as trauma, which may include tooth loss or facial bone damage. The health of the soft (gum) tissues that surround the tooth requires careful assessment to make certain future problems do not arise. Time pressures with work and availability for treatment may also be a greater concern. Therefore, there are many additional factors, which modify the treatment options that are available to correct their malocclusion.

Generally adult orthodontic treatment progresses smoothly. Due to a high level of acceptance and motivation, most adults are more cooperative than adolescents, which result in treatment duration of between 12-24 months for many procedures. The use of ceramic braces can further improve the experience, as these appliances are considerably less noticeable than traditional metal braces. For mild crowding problems, Invisalign (invisible clear aligners) may be the perfect solution.

With adult treatment, tooth extraction to relieve moderate to severe crowding or bite discrepancies may be required. When bony expansion or a large correction of the bite is required, surgical assistance may be required from an oral surgeon. When extractions are needed, the pattern chosen often has to be modified to take into account existing fillings or complex dental restorations such as bridges or dental implants.

Another important area of adult orthodontics is 'adjunctive' to other dental procedures. When complex, multidisciplinary treatment is needed, orthodontics can be used to simplify the treatment and significantly improve the outcome, both functionally and esthetically.

The following information is from the American Association of Orthodontists recommending treatment for adults, when appropriate, in conjunction with regular dental care.

Some of the reasons correction of orthodontic problems are important to adults:

  • Can help prevent or improve periodontal problems
  • Can help prevent or reduce further bone loss around teeth
  • Improves ability of the dentist to restore missing teeth
  • Improves aesthetics for a better smile and facial appearance
  • Improves function to teeth
  • Improves self-confidence and self-esteem
  • Improves oral health

By working together, then dental team can achieve results for patients that cannot be produced alone.

Final treatment decisions should be made in consultation with the family dentist, the orthodontist and other specialists, if necessary.

Problems to Watch for in Adults:

Malocclusions, some of which are illustrated above, may be improved by orthodontic treatment. Final Treatment decisions should be made in consultation with the family dentist, the orthodontist and other specialists, as necessary.

We are a Certified Invisalign® Provider

Consider Invisalign to get the beautiful, straight teeth you've always wanted - without braces. A complimentary consultation with Dr. Agenter can determine if Invisalign is right for you.

What is it?
Invisalign® uses a series of invisible, removable, and comfortable aligners that no one can tell you're wearing. So, you can smile more during treatment as well as after. Invisalign® is made with 3-D computer imaging technology and has been proven effective. More than 70% of orthodontists in the US and Canada are certified to treat with Invisalign®.

Why would I want it?
Not only are the aligners invisible, they are removable, so you can eat and drink what you want while in treatment. Plus, brushing and flossing are no problem. They are also comfortable, with no metal to cause mouth abrasions during treatment. And no metal and wires usually means you spend less time getting adjustments. Invisalign® also allows you to view your own virtual treatment plan when you start so you can see how your straight teeth will look when your treatment is complete.

How does it work?
You wear each set of aligners for about two weeks, removing them only to eat, drink, brush, and floss. As you replace each aligner with the next in the series, your teeth will move - little by little, week by week - until they have straightened to their final positions. You'll visit us about once every six weeks to ensure that your treatment is progressing as planned. Total treatment time averages 9-15 months and the average number of aligners worn during treatment is between 18 and 30, but both will vary from case to case.

The following information is from the American Association of Orthodontists:
Emergency Treatments
The following orthodontic emergencies and their treatments are listed in the order of the least severe to the most severe. Only the most severe emergencies may require immediate attention by an orthodontist. The majority of these are easily treated with a follow-up by the patient's orthodontist.

Food Caught Between Teeth
This is not an emergency, but can be a little uncomfortable or embarrassing for the braces-wearing patient. It is easily fixed with a piece of dental floss to help remove the food, or use an interproximal brush or toothpick to dislodge food caught between teeth and braces.

Ligatures Come Off
Tiny rubber bands or small, fine wires, known as ligatures, hold the wire to the bracket. If a rubber ligature should come off, you may be able to put it back in place using sterile tweezers. If a wire ligature comes loose, simply remove it with sterile tweezers. If a wire ligature is sticking out into the lip but is not loose, it may be bent back down with a Q-tip or pencil eraser to eliminate the irritation.

Of course, when one ligature pops off or breaks, others may follow. Be sure to examine all ligatures. Missing or broken ligatures should be brought to the attention of the patient's parent/guardian, who should then inform the orthodontist.

If a rubber or wire ligature is lost, notify the parent/guardian so that the orthodontist may advise whether the patient should be seen.

Mouth Sores
Some patients are susceptible to episodes of mouth sores. While braces do not cause them, they may be precipitated or exacerbated by an irritation from braces. One or several areas of ulceration of the cheeks, lips or tongue may appear. This is not an emergency, but may be very uncomfortable for the patient. Prompt relief may be achieved by applying a small amount of topical anesthetic (such as Orbase or Ora-Gel) directly to the ulcerated surface using a cotton swab. Instruct the patient to reapply as needed.

Irritation of Lips or Cheeks
Sometimes new braces can be irritating to the mouth, especially when the patient is eating. A small amount of non-medicinal relief wax makes an excellent buffer between metal and mouth. Simply pinch off a small piece and roll it into a ball the size of a small pea. Flatten the ball and place it completely over the area of the braces causing irritation. The patient may then eat more comfortably. Let the patient know that if the wax is accidentally ingested, it's not a problem. The wax is harmless.

Protruding Wire
Occasionally, the end of a wire will work itself out of place and irritate the patient's mouth. Use a Q-tip or pencil eraser to push the wire so that it is flat against the tooth. If the wire cannot be moved into a comfortable position, cover it with relief wax. (See Irritation of Lips or Cheeks above for instructions on applying relief wax) The patient's parent/guardian will need to make the orthodontist ware of the problem.

In a situation where the wire is extremely bothersome and the patient will not be able to see the orthodontist anytime soon, you may, as a last resort, clip the wire.

Reduce the possibility of a patient swallowing the snipped piece of wire by using folded tissue or gauze around the area. Use a pair of sharp clippers and snip off the protruding wire. Relief wax may still be necessary to provide comfort to the irritated area.

Loose Brackets, Wires or Brands
If the braces have come loose in any way, the parent/guardian needs to be notified, and they should call the orthodontist to determine appropriate next steps.

Brackets are the parts of braces attached to teeth with a special adhesive. They are generally positioned in the center of each tooth. The bracket can be knocked off if the patient has eaten one of those hard or crunchy foods orthodontic patients are instructed to avoid, or if the mouth is struck while at play. (Encourage all patients, especially those the braces, to wear a protective mouth guard while playing sports.)

If the bracket is off center, the adhesive may have failed. Call the parent/guardian, and recommend that they immediately notify the orthodontist, who will determine the course of action.

If the loose bracket has rotated on the wire and is sticking out and the patient cannot immediately be taken to the orthodontist, you can do a temporary fix to alleviate discomfort and prevent further damage. But take care to prevent swallowing or other injury.

To put the bracket back in place, use sterile tweezers to slide the bracket along the wire until it is between two teeth. Rotate the bracket back to the proper position, then slide it back to the center of the tooth.

Discomfort
It's normal for a patient to have discomfort for a day or two after braces or retainers are adjusted. But it can make eating uncomfortable. Reassure the patient that the discomfort is both normal and temporary. Encourage soft foods. Have the patient rinse the mouth with warm salt water.

Piece of Application is Swallowed
This is rare, but when it does happen, it can be fairly alarming to the patient. Encourage your patient to remain calm. If the patient is coughing excessively or having difficulty breathing, the piece could have been aspirated.

If you are able to see the piece, you may carefully attempt to remove it. But do not make the attempt if you could cause harm.

If appropriate under the circumstances, examine the patient's braces for problems that may result from the missing piece, such as looseness or irritation, and treat as specified above.

If you are unable to see the piece and believe it may be have been aspirated, notify the parent / guardian and the orthodontist immediately.

Click here to print your new patient form.  Please complete this form and bring it to your first appointment.

 

Food Caught Between Teeth
This is not an emergency, but can be a little uncomfortable or embarrassing for the braces-wearing patient. It is easily fixed with a piece of dental floss to help remove the food, or use an interproximal brush or toothpick to dislodge food caught between teeth and braces.

Ligatures Come Off
Tiny rubber bands or small, fine wires, known as ligatures, hold the wire to the bracket. If a rubber ligature should come off, you may be able to put it back in place using sterile tweezers. If a wire ligature comes loose, simply remove it with sterile tweezers. If a wire ligature is sticking out into the lip but is not loose, it may be bent back down with a Q-tip or pencil eraser to eliminate the irritation.

Of course, when one ligature pops off or breaks, others may follow. Be sure to examine all ligatures. Missing or broken ligatures should be brought to the attention of the patient's parent/guardian, who should then inform the orthodontist. 

If a rubber or wire ligature is lost, notify the parent/guardian so that the orthodontist may advise whether the patient should be seen.

Mouth Sores
Some patients are susceptible to episodes of mouth sores. While braces do not cause them, they may be precipitated or exacerbated by an irritation from braces. One or several areas of ulceration of the cheeks, lips or tongue may appear. This is not an emergency, but may be very uncomfortable for the patient. Prompt relief may be achieved by applying a small amount of topical anesthetic (such as Orbase or Ora-Gel) directly to the ulcerated surface using a cotton swab. Instruct the patient to reapply as needed.

Irritation of Lips or Cheeks
Sometimes new braces can be irritating to the mouth, especially when the patient is eating. A small amount of non-medicinal relief wax makes an excellent buffer between metal and mouth. Simply pinch off a small piece and roll it into a ball the size of a small pea. Flatten the ball and place it completely over the area of the braces causing irritation. The patient may then eat more comfortably. Let the patient know that if the wax is accidentally ingested, it's not a problem. The wax is harmless.

Protruding Wire
Occasionally, the end of a wire will work itself out of place and irritate the patient's mouth. Use a Q-tip or pencil eraser to push the wire so that it is flat against the tooth. If the wire cannot be moved into a comfortable position, cover it with relief wax. (See Irritation of Lips or Cheeks above for instructions on applying relief wax) The patient's parent/guardian will need to make the orthodontist ware of the problem. 

In a situation where the wire is extremely bothersome and the patient will not be able to see the orthodontist anytime soon, you may, as a last resort, clip the wire.

Reduce the possibility of a patient swallowing the snipped piece of wire by using folded tissue or gauze around the area. Use a pair of sharp clippers and snip off the protruding wire. Relief wax may still be necessary to provide comfort to the irritated area.

Loose Brackets, Wires or Brands
If the braces have come loose in any way, the parent/guardian needs to be notified, and they should call the orthodontist to determine appropriate next steps. 

Brackets are the parts of braces attached to teeth with a special adhesive. They are generally positioned in the center of each tooth. The bracket can be knocked off if the patient has eaten one of those hard or crunchy foods orthodontic patients are instructed to avoid, or if the mouth is struck while at play. (Encourage all patients, especially those the braces, to wear a protective mouth guard while playing sports.)

If the bracket is off center, the adhesive may have failed. Call the parent/guardian, and recommend that they immediately notify the orthodontist, who will determine the course of action.

If the loose bracket has rotated on the wire and is sticking out and the patient cannot immediately be taken to the orthodontist, you can do a temporary fix to alleviate discomfort and prevent further damage. But take care to prevent swallowing or other injury.

To put the bracket back in place, use sterile tweezers to slide the bracket along the wire until it is between two teeth. Rotate the bracket back to the proper position, then slide it back to the center of the tooth.

Discomfort
It's normal for a patient to have discomfort for a day or two after braces or retainers are adjusted. But it can make eating uncomfortable. Reassure the patient that the discomfort is both normal and temporary. Encourage soft foods. Have the patient rinse the mouth with warm salt water.

Piece of Application is Swallowed
This is rare, but when it does happen, it can be fairly alarming to the patient. Encourage your patient to remain calm. If the patient is coughing excessively or having difficulty breathing, the piece could have been aspirated. 

If you are able to see the piece, you may carefully attempt to remove it. But do not make the attempt if you could cause harm.

If appropriate under the circumstances, examine the patient's braces for problems that may result from the missing piece, such as looseness or irritation, and treat as specified above.

If you are unable to see the piece and believe it may be have been aspirated, notify the parent / guardian and the orthodontist immediately.

Now that you have braces, it's important to know how to properly take care of them throughout your entire orthodontic treatment.

Brushing

It's more important than ever to brush and floss regularly when you have braces, so the teeth and gums are healthy after orthodontic treatment. Patients who do not keep their teeth clean may require more frequent visits to the dentist for a professional cleaning and may develop permanent white stains that are noticeable after the braces are removed. Adults who have a history of gum disease may also need to see a periodontist during orthodontic treatment.

Eating with Braces

Don't worry; you'll be eating popcorn and snacking on potato chips again in no time! However, before you can start enjoying some of the treats you love, you will need to take special care to avoid any foods that could damage your braces.

Foods to avoid with braces:

Chewy foods - bagels, licorice

Crunchy foods - popcorn, chips, ice

Sticky foods - caramel candies, chewing gum Hard foods - nuts, hard candies

Foods that require biting into - corn on the cob, apples, carrots

Foods you CAN eat with braces:

Dairy - soft cheese, pudding, milk-based drinks

Breads - soft tortillas, pancakes, muffins w/o nuts

Grains - pasta, soft-cooked rice

Meats/poultry - soft-cooked chicken, meatballs, lunch meats

Seafood - tuna, salmon, crab cakes

Vegetables - mashed potatoes, steamed spinach, beans

Fruits - applesauce, bananas, fruit juice

Treats - ice cream w/o nuts, milkshakes, Jell-O, soft cake

Soreness caused from braces and appliances

When you first get your braces, you may notice that your teeth and mouth feel tender or sore. This is completely normal, and we promise your mouth will not be sore forever! To relieve the pain, we recommend dissolving one teaspoon of salt in eight ounces of lukewarm water. Swish and gargle this solution in your mouth for a couple of minutes. If the pain is more severe and does not go away after rinsing, you can also try taking a pain reliever (whatever you would normally take for a headache). It is also not uncommon for your lips, cheeks, and tongue to become irritated for one to two weeks as they toughen and get used to the braces. You can put wax on the braces to lessen this. We'll show you how!

Loose Teeth

If your teeth begin feeling a little loose, don't worry; this is normal! Your braces must first loosen your teeth in order to move them into the right position. Once your teeth have been repositioned, they will no longer be loose.

Loose Wires and Bands

The wires and bands on your braces may come loose. If this happens, please contact us as soon as possible so that we can check and repair your appliance. If any piece of your appliance comes off, be sure to save it and bring it to the office with you.

You can temporarily fix the loose wire by using the back of a spoon or the eraser end of a pencil to carefully and gently push the wire back into place. If the loose wire is causing irritation to your lips or cheeks, put wax or a wet cotton ball over the broken wire to relieve the pain.

Take Care of your Appliances Damaged

Appliances can increase the length of your orthodontic treatment, so make sure to take care of all your appliances. Your teeth and jaw can only move into their correct positions if you consistently wear the rubber bands, retainers, or other appliances as they are prescribed.

Playing Sports with Braces

You can still play sports even while undergoing orthodontic treatment. If you do play sports, it is recommended that you wear a mouthguard to protect your teeth and your braces (we would be happy to provide one free of charge-just let us know that you need one).

In case of a sports emergency, be sure to immediately check your mouth and your appliances for any damage that may have occurred. If you notice any loose teeth, or if your appliances have been damaged, please contact our office right away. You can temporarily relieve the discomfort with wax or by rinsing your mouth with warm salt water.

Bummed out about having braces?

Invisalign® Teen gives you a whole new way to wear braces for a clearly amazing smile! 

I have enough to worry about...now I need braces too?

The team has a game this Friday night, homecoming is in a month, and what about my yearbook pictures?! Don't stress; with Invisalign Teen you won't need to turn down any dates, wear a paper bag over your head, or hide out in your room for two years!

Invisalign Teen aligners are a perfect fit for your lifestyle, because aligners are:

  • Clear
  • Removable
  • Super comfortable
  • Customized just for you

Pizza, Popcorn... no Problem!

You've probably heard from friends that with braces you won't be able to eat anything. With Invisalign Teen you can eat whatever you want! Unlike traditional metal braces, your Invisalign Teen aligners are removable, which means you can go ahead and eat all the things you love without worrying about breaking a bracket or losing a rubber band. Cheers!

It's your life, keep it that way!

Invisalign aligners are really comfortable and very durable. They fit in with any of your extracurricular activities. So whether you're swimming the 50 meter race, out on the field throwing the football, or playing the clarinet with the school's band, you don't have to worry about your braces getting in the way!

Welcome to Shine Orthodontics! We look forward to meeting you. Our primary goal is to provide you with the healthy, straight, beautiful smile you've always wanted. We understand that choosing to receive orthodontic care is a big decision, and we respect your reasons for wanting to improve the way you look and feel. The Shine Orthodontic Team is excited to work with you to make your orthodontic experience as comfortable, convenient and rewarding as possible. We use the latest technology, offering a variety of safe and gentle treatment options, giving you the customized, individual care that you deserve.

What to Anticipate 

  • Welcome tour of our office 
  • Exam and consultation take about one hour 
  • Digital records to clarify any orthodontic needs 
  • A panoramic x-ray is sometimes helpful (one that shows all the teeth on a single picture) - especially if all adult teeth have not grown in. 
  • Dr. Agenter will perform a clinical exam, listen to your needs and desires, discuss your treatment options and timing, and answer any questions you may have. 
  • If you are ready for orthodontics, we can start your treatment the same day! 
  • The treatment coordinator will discuss appointments and financing including insurance questions. 
  • If you are not ready for treatment, we may set-up an observation appointment to monitor growth. 
  • As our gift to you, there is no fee for your consultation or digital records!
  • Family friendly, fun environment!
  • Compassionate, efficient care delivered by experienced doctor and staff
  • Paperless office utilizing cutting-edge digital technology
  • Low force, low friction braces to reduce treatment time and discomfort
  • Flexible financing to fit your lifestyle
  • 2014 "Business of the Year" by Joshua's Place
  • Your results are guaranteed for life!
Image of young girl

The American Association of Orthodontists recommends an orthodontic check-up for all children by age seven. Bite problems may be present at a young age, which if left unattended, may be difficult to correct at a later age or even cause damage to the permanent teeth. A significant bite problem can hinder proper cleaning and cause functional problems as your child grows, including gum disease, cavities and speech disorders. The goal of early treatment is to develop the jaw size in order to accommodate all the permanent teeth and to relate the upper and lower jaws to each other. Early detection and treatment can prevent your child from needing costly and time-consuming dental care in the future. Dr. Mike and Dr. Ashley always considers conservative treatment options first. Early intervention, also known as a Phase 1 Treatment, can reduce treatment time for your child's braces later on and provide a stable, healthy bite for a lifetime.